NCAA Investigator in Tennessee Deserves Bonus by kentsterling

by Kent Sterling

The NCAA D-1 Committee on Infractions released findings of major violations against Chattanooga for impermissible texts and phone calls to recruits.  On one hand, who really cares what Chattanooga does?  They’re not exactly tearing up the college athletic world.  On the other, this is the second piece of big news from the NCAA in a week originating from eastern Tennessee.

Knoxville and Chattanooga are separated by 112 of I-75 interstate highway, and if the NCAA investigators work regions, the guy traveling that part of the country is earning his money and then some.

Tennessee is in deep trouble for all kinds of impermissible, but in particular for photographs showing two big time recruits being photographed at Bruce Pearl’s home during unofficial visits – a big violation because there is no wiggle room for Pearl to claim ignorance or scatterbrainedness.  There is no doubt that every coach knows what is supposed to happen during unofficial visits, and Pearl willfully violated them by inviting kids to his house.

Chattanooga is different as they have been trying to get their compliance department up and running effectively for four years, and they self-reported for too many calls and texts.

I’m not sure whether NCAA investigators roll on to college campuses dressed like the Hoover Boys in the south as racial motivated murders were investigated in the early 1960s – like Gene Hackman and Willem Defoe in “Mississippi Burning”, but with Mark Emmert taking the reins of the NCAA as the replacement for Myles Brand, I would be on the lookout for a bulked up and aggressive investigative staff on college campuses.

At worst, the NCAA is going to make a very public example of someone.  The best we can hope for is an NCAA that dig deep and at least puts a scare into the renegade schools that ignore rules in an effort to feather their own nest.

The person doing the work on I-75 between Knoxville and Chattanooga is kicking ass and taking names.  Corruption in college athletics has been around as long as college athletic themselves, but maybe the tide is turning.

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