Sports From the Couch–Why Are We Surprised? by jshowal2
November 10, 2011, 6:07 pm
Filed under: College Football, Sports from the Couch | Tags:

by Jeff Showalter

Why are we surprised?

Major college football programs have not been “programs” for decades. The BCS is business and in business, “problems” get covered up. Recruiting and donation support dries up, you lose games, and then it repeats itself.

 Why are we surprised?

 This time it wasPennState, many thought the last bastion of a world gone by. To a lot of people,PennStatewas the Mayberry of college football. The worst thing that happens in Mayberry is Otis locking himself up for a day or two. Surely this place, a long drive from any regional airport, was were kids went to class, played football, won games and went on to long careers as business leaders, lawyers and doctors. This is where the Cleavers would have wanted their kids to go to school. No way could some shady underlying plague of unlawfulness and moral ineptitude ever happen here!

 Why are we surprised?

 I googled “college football suspensions” and in .07 seconds had 500,000 hits.

 Why are we surprised?

 Have you paid attention to what goes on inSouth Bend? Declan Stevenson lost his life last year because Notre Dame wasn’t smart enough to get out of a storms way.  Google “Lizzie Seeburg”. I’m guessing her parents are not surprised by anything that goes on in college football.  Michael Floyd has had three drinking arrests but there was no way in hell ND had a chance at a BCS game without him.  Floyd plays.

 Why are we surprised?

 Barry Switzer ran anOklahomaprogram that resembled the Wild West.  Thirty Florida Gators were arrested under the tutelage of Urban Meyer.  Bobby Bowden was college football’s Father Flannigan and I my brain reminds me of “they’re good kids” in that southern twang Bowden has.

 Why are we surprised?

 Miami? Do I need to go there? Tressel lied atOhioState. USC is on probation for cheating

Football, by nature, is barbaric. That is why we love it so. But we are aghast when this barbarism goes on off the field? Women have been abused for years by players and coaches, but only in the most extreme cases do either players lose their scholarship or coaches their job.

 Why are we surprised?

 Kids die every summer from practicing in extreme heat. Players lose ligaments, break bones and injure their brains every day as coaches scream out for more intensity and harder play.

 Why are we surprised?

 I lost track of how many suspensions the Garcia kid fromSouth Carolinahad before being permanently banned. The SEC permits coaches to over sign athletes and then kick them to the curb.  Felony charges could only keep Jordan Jefferson away from LSU for a few games and the potential national champions had three players suspended one game for smoking synthetic weed. Amazingly, all players were on board and ready to go when the bus left for Tuscaloosa last week.

 Why are we surprised?

 The BCS and its members are multi million dollar businesses, tucked away in cities likeAustin,Ann Arbor,Athens,Knoxville, andStillwater. When you have multi-million dollar businesses you have competition and like in the real world, a criminal element rises when there is no other way. We shouldn’t have been surprised by Enron or WorldCom; the banks needing saved or Bernie Madoff. We shouldn’t be surprised by the HP scandal or hookers being brought in for big clients.  Wall Street trades on the big board, the BCS trades on the rankings boards, the recruiting stars and the television contracts. Companies cover up crimes to prevent the stock price from going down and a fear of losing billions of dollars. BCS schools cover up sins for the same reason.

 What happened atPennState could have happened at any BCS school and probably had the same outcome. Collateral damage be damned. Now we watch as the lives of innocent children have been forever scarred.  Yet across America, BCS schools will have stadiums filled beyond capacity watching kids try to injure each other as coaches scream at the top of their lungs when a player misses a tackle or drops the ball. Millions more will watch on TV. I know, because I am one of them. I love watching college football. Yet we must NEVER be so naive that something so egregious can happen?

 I can no longer be surprised.

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What I’ve Learned So Far in St. Louis by kentsterling

by Kent Sterling

For seven weeks, I’ve been a St. Louisan as the program director of 101 ESPN – one of the best sportstalk radio stations in America.  This is the first move my family has made in 18 years, and the first time as bona fide adults.  There is a lot to know, and I’m picking up as much as I can as quickly as I can, and it’s a challenge.

Here is a list – a bit of a primer – of the lessons for those considering a similar change in course:

Selling a house is not cheap, and it’s not easy – All those accommodations home owners make to the age of their home are exposed and corrections must be made.  We replaced or updated a long list of items that had been petty annoyances for years.  There is a feeling for us that we want those who trust us enough to buy our home to be very happy with their choice.  We owe it to the buyer to make sure everything is right, so we replaced faucets, carpeting, and shower doors.  Julie and Ryan worked their asses off to make the backyard the wonderful getaway that we always wanted it to be.  I wish we had done it years ago, so we could have enjoyed it more.

The best part of the house not selling in the first two weeks it has been listed is that we have absolutely no idea where we want to live in St. Louis.  City?  Country?  Near work?  Near golf?  In the woods?  In a town?  Julie, Ryan, and I have no idea where to land.

Driving 280 miles each way every weekend isn’t that tough – The drive between Indianapolis and St. Louis isn’t a bother at all.  I enjoy a little solitude now and then, and the almost four-hour drive is a simple and mindless jaunt without a metropolitan area in between.  101 ESPN has a huge signal – I can hear it almost all the way to Terre Haute – so listening uninterrupted is easy and because the product is high quality, very enjoyable.

With family in Indy, working is all there is to do in St. Louis – People always say that there is no such thing as work if you love what you do, and that’s true.  Maybe that’s why I don’t mind being in the office from before eight to after seven most days.  It also helps that my option is another night alone in my hotel room at the Doubletree.  Nothing against the Doubletree, but all things being equal, I’d rather be in the office.  When Julie and/or Ryan move out here, that will change a little bit as the discipline to devote time for family is every bit as important as the discipline of working hard.  I learned that while working in Indianapolis – accepting more and more responsibility as a manager’s faith.

Meeting new people can be joyful – I’ve never been a gregarious guy with new people.  It has always taken me a significant period of time to feel comfortable with strangers, but that seemed more a choice than a psychological disorder, so I told myself to ignore the impulse to dip my toe in the water before easing into the social pool.  I jumped in, and continue to get lunch with people as though they will be future friends rather than longtime strangers.  Let’s face it, I’m not George Clooney or Sam Bradford, so people aren’t going to tolerate my social reticence because in the end it will be worth it.  Fortunately, St. Louisans are a welcoming bunch, so I’m having a great time introducing myself to people I haven’t met.

St. Louis is a cool city (not in climate) – The people in St. Louis tend to stay in St. Louis, so there aren’t a huge number of ambassadors running around the midwest extolling the many virtues of the ‘Gateway to the West’.  That might be how St. Louisans like it.  The city is like some secret along the Mississippi that some very lucky outsiders occasionally wander into.  Getting around town is a challenge, but well worth it.  It ever a midwestern city was built for GPS, it’s St. Louis, but the rewards of a meal on ‘The Hill’, a trip to Rams Park for practice, or a game at Busch Stadium has all been more than worth it.  There are an endless series of suburban towns – some of which are forest filled and rural, while others are very typical.  The people, as I mentioned earlier, are very friendly.  People told me when we decided to move to St. Louis that its people are “very provincial”.  If they meant people are proud of their hometown, they were right.  But I got the impression that they meant the people were cold to outsiders.  I have found that purely false.

In a related thought, heat is relative.  It’s been really hot and humid since I got to St. Louis, but it no longer bothers me at all.  It’s not a dry heat, but it’s a heat that is easy to ignore.

St. Louis is a great golf town – I like golf.  Rather than a good walk spoiled, I see golf as a great hike enhanced.  St. Louis has beautiful and affordable courses.  The grasses are very hearty, so the divots are small.  My shoulders and elbows throb a bit after a round in Indy.  The turf is so loose that I can get a little deep with divots, and the shock of the impact causes some aches and pains.  In St. Louis, no such worries.

Baseball is good for sportstalk – During summers in Indianapolis, the only major league – and I realize I’m stretching the definition of the term ‘major league’ – is the WNBA.  That’s right, from the end of the Pacers season through the opening of Colts camp, the Indiana Fever are the only game in town.  St. Louis, with the Cardinals, Rams, and Blues, is a 365 day sports town.  People love all three teams, and all are committed to bringing in high character guys.  I love it.

The Cards are great – I know that as a lifelong Cubs fan, I’m supposed to somehow hate the Cardinals, but they play the game the right way.  Despite the Cubs current run of seven straight wins, they continue to run the bases like tools, miss cutoff men, and swing at pitches outside the strike zone.  Rooting for the Cubs, where no culture of winning exists, is a brutal exercise in futility.  The only culture is of unearned exorbitance.  The Cards are completely unlike the Cubs.  They play baseball the right way.  I have long thought that Albert Pujols is the best hitter I have ever seen, but watching him night after night it’s clear that his excellence extends beyond what he does with the bat.  While not fast, he might be the smartest baserunner I’ve seen since Roberto Clemente.  He wins games by taking the extra base, and that surprised me.  Maybe he is just on a great run of luck not getting thrown out, but over the last seven weeks, I’ve been stunned by his smart aggression.

All NFL teams are not run like the Colts – There is no denying the consistent excellence of the Colts over the last decade, but there is also no denying that their treatment of the media is more than a little off-putting and unnecessarily paranoid.  The Rams are the opposite.  I stood next to Rams GM Kevin Demoff for a half-hour the other night talking about all kinds of things, and it struck me more than once that doing the same with a member of the Colts front office would be almost unthinkable.  At one point with Kevin, I excused myself because practice was ongoing.  He said, “No, no, stick around.”  I have great respect for Bill and Chris Polian (and like both), but it’s nice to know there is more than one way to skin a cat when it comes to dealing with the media.

It’s hard to argue with the success the Colts have achieved, but I believe the same results (or better) might be gained by relaxing a little bit and enjoying the company of people who want nothing more than to help build the popularity of the franchise.

Working and writing are not compatible – I would love to write more often, but it’s impossible.  To those of you who enjoy this website, I apologize for not being more active here, but as I get more and more settled, hopefully I can find the time and energy to write things worth reading.



MLB Antiquating Themselves Out of Public’s Minds by dustinlytle
November 4, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: Dustin Lytle

by Dustin Lytle

Major League Baseball is fading into obscurity faster than Petey Pablo. Sunday’s Giants vs. Rangers World Series game drew a lower rating than the Sunday Night Football game between the Steelers and Saints. In other words, one regular season game less than half way through the year drew more fans watching than baseball’s shining moment. Why is this?

The days of baseball being the United States of America’s national sport are over. A large percentage of players are not from the United States. Put simply, these countries’ children (especially the Dominican Republic) group with two main sports: Soccer and Baseball. Children in the United States have many more options due to organized leagues, facilities, television exposure and wealth. Children in the United States today can play Soccer, Baseball, Golf, Football, Hockey, Tennis, Track and Field, Gymnastics or any number of other sports and activities. The high-action sports of football and basketball are much more appealing to this younger generation. Not many people want to stand around and play a slow, drawn-out game of baseball anymore.  No one wants to watch these games either. This has been the case for quite a few years as technology has become more advanced.

With instant internet access, answers are only a click away. The same goes for being able to watch any sport or show any time you want. We are becoming more impatient, coming to expect this instant gratification of finding information quickly or being able to watch whatever we want. Baseball is the antonym of fast-paced, rather old-fashioned, slow and antiquated.

The NFL has taken technology and run with it. They quickly embraced Instant Replay, a big win for the sport. NFL broadcasts include the infamous yellow first-down line that is now engrained into our minds when we watch football, even in the stands. Fantasy football has driven a large growth in popularity as more people now are excited about a matchup like the Bengals vs. Cardinals when 10 years ago, many of those same people would not watch it if it were the only show on television at the time. These are a small sample of the technological advancements that the NFL has embraced.

Combine the ever-growing popularity of the NFL, the slow game play of baseball and the falling out of baseball among youth and you’ve got a recipe for disaster in baseball. Sure, baseball will reign supreme in the dog days of summer when the only other thing on is the WNBA, but when Football and Basketball are in season, baseball is irrelevant. In order to succeed in today’s modern, technology-based world, MLB needs to take a page out of the NFL’s playbook and run with the technological innovation or else be left in the dust.



Week 6 Fantasy Football Preview by justinwhitaker
October 15, 2010, 4:48 pm
Filed under: Justin Whitaker, NFL, Uncategorized | Tags: ,

by Justin Whitaker

(Puts hand on Bible)

“I, Justin Whitaker, swear to not make any jokes about Ben Roethilsberger’s ‘triumphant’ return or Brett Favre’s package during this fantasy football Week 6 preview even as tempting as it may be to take a shot below the belt.”

The Studs

Philip Rivers, QB, San Diego Chargers at St. Louis Rams

Because I am a little biased, I am going to limit the times I put Peyton Manning in this slot. If I wasn’t fair then he would be locked as King Stud every week. Instead it’s the NFL leader in yards and touchdowns six weeks into the season who will have another solid game this week. Rivers has thrown over 400 yards twice this season and has had at least two touchdowns in each game. The quarterback’s play is finally starting to catch up with his loud mouth.

Projected Stats: 350 yards, 3 TDs

Chris Johnson, RB, Tennessee Titans at Jacksonville Jaguars

Through five weeks, CJ’s performance has seesawed every other week. Two touchdowns and at least 125 yards in weeks 1, 3 and 5. Well it’s Week 6 and it is time for Johnson to bust his trend on Monday Night Football.

Projected Stats: 135 yards rushing, 35 yards receiving, 2 TDs

Hakeem Nicks, WR, New York Giants versus Detroit Lions

If you ever doubted Nicks’ ability, (I did), then it’s time to wake up. Eli Manning’s No. 1 target had 12 catches for 130 yards and 2 TDs last week against the porous Houston secondary. This week against the Detroit Lions, expect more of the same. This 22-year-old wide receiver is here to stay.

Projected Stats: 7 catches, 120 yards, TD

Honorable Mention: Peyton Manning, QB (325 yards, 3 TD), Mark Sanchez, QB (280 yards, 2 TD), Rashad Mendenhall, RB (125 yards, TD), Ray Rice, RB (140 total yards, 2 TD), Miles Austin, WR (8 catches, 125 yards, TD), Malcom Floyd, WR (6 catches, 100 yards, TD)

The Duds

Jay Cutler, QB, Chicago Bears versus Seattle Seahawks

The offensive line of the Chicago Bears is weaker than Betty White’s bench press. It’s God-awful how embarrassing they are. How successful will the (probably not) apprehensive gunslinger be returning from a concussion? I would guess not very well, Cutler doesn’t trust his line and I wouldn’t either. Watch to see how he fares in this one before starting him as your No. 1 QB.

Projected Stats: 250 yards, TD, 2 INT

Felix Jones, RB, Dallas Cowboys at Minnesota Vikings

After a season-high 15 carries and 109 yards last week one would think the success might continue. Well do not buy into the same hype that so many people believed that the Cowboys were actually good. This team is a mess right now so it’s completely unpredictable on what they will do. This game could either be a high scoring aerial assault or a 4 field goals win the game type of matchup. Either way Jones doesn’t seem to fit into either of those outcomes.

Projected Stats: 9 carries for 32 yards, 2 catches for 12 yards

Mike Sims-Walker, WR, Jacksonville Jaguars against Tennessee Titans

The fantasy breakout star of 2009 has been extremely disappointing so far in 2010. In three home games this season here is Sims-Walker’s total, 2 catches for 34 yards. In THREE games. This week against the division rival Tennessee Titans don’t be surprised if much like their games in the city of Jacksonville, Sims-Walker is blacked out. It’s probably a good thing Jacksonville fans won’t get to watch this.

Projected Stats: 2 catches for 28 yards

Honorable Mention: Donovan McNabb, QB (200 yards passing, TD, INT),  Arian Foster, RB (12 carries for 44 yards), Knowshon Moreno, RB (15 carries for 46 yards), Johnny Knox, WR (2 catches, 23 yards), Donald Driver, WR (4 catches, 42 yards)

The Sleeper

Mike Williams, WR, Tampa Bay Buccaneers versus New Orleans Saints

The rookie from Syracuse has caught a touchdown in three of his four games this season and is only owned in 50 percent of all ESPN leagues. While he might have hit his ceiling already, pick him up and give Williams a chance before everyone else in your league catches on.

Projected Stats: 5 catches for 85 yards, TD

Honorable Mention: Kevin Kolb, QB (275 yards, 2 TD), Ryan Torain, RB (90 yards, 1 TDs), Kenny Britt, WR (4 catches, 75 yards, TD)



Week 5 fantasy football preview by justinwhitaker

By Justin Whitaker

After taking my bye last week, I’m back and ready to help forecast Week 5 of fantasy football in the NFL.

The Studs

Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts versus Kansas City Chiefs

Manning could easily be in this spot every week but this week’s situation makes him King Stud.  The Kansas City secondary ranks 24th in the NFL in passing yards but once Manning gets done with the Chiefs look for them to be even lower. The first quarter of the NFL season’s MVP will continue his hot streak this week.

Projected Stats: 335 yards, 3 TDs

Maurice Jones-Drew, RB, Jacksonville Jaguars at Buffalo Bills

While MJD started off slow, the bowling ball is slowly but surely on the rise. Look for MJD to be a strike this week as he rolls over the dreadful Bills defense who give up a league worst 31.2 points per game.

Projected Stats: 125 yards rushing, 30 yards receiving, 2 TDs

Calvin Johnson, WR, Detroit Lions versus St. Louis Rams

As evident by the fact that Shaun Hill is throwing him the ball, Kent Sterling or myself could be throwing him the ball and he would be having an All-Pro season. If Johnson had an elite QB, his statistics would be the best in the league year in and year out. Due to St. Louis’ lack of corners expect a big day out of the Georgia Tech product.

Projected Stats: 9 catches, 120 yards, TD

Honorable Mention: Matt Schuab, QB (300 yards, 3 TD), Matt Ryan, QB (275 yards, 2 TD), Arian Foster, RB (115 yards, 2 TD), Jahvid Best, RB (150 total yards, TD), Roddy White, WR (7 catches, 115 yards, TD), Reggie Wayne, WR (8 catches, 110 yards, TD)

The Duds

Gotham City's former DA and Joe Flacco's alter-ego, Two-Face.

Joe Flacco, QB, Baltimore Ravens versus Denver Broncos

Thus far Flacco’s season has mirrored Batman villain Two-Face. One half of it has been really good (Week 3, 262 yds and 3 TDs) and the other has been dreadful (Week 2, 154 yds and 4 INTs). Champ Bailey does a great job limiting a team’s No. 1 receiver so look for Anquan Boldin to struggle in this game also. Flacco will be Harvey Dent’s bad side in this game, stay away.

Projected Stats: 220 yards, TD, INT

Ryan Mathews, RB, San Diego Chargers against Oakland Raiders

After all the preseason hype and SI.com’s Peter King stating, “Take Mathews in the first round, he’s worth it.” Well sorry to burst your preseason bubble Mr. King, but Mathews has played more like a waiver wire drop. He’s 100% owned in all ESPN league but 100% a bust up until now. Sure it’s only Week 5 and he’s been banged up, but 156 yards and a TD is something he should’ve had in a game, not three. Plus look for Mike Tolbert to steal a lot of carries since he’s actually playing well

Projected Stats: 10 carries for 42 yards, 2 catches for 15 yards

Anyone seen Marques Colston?

Marques Colston, WR, New Orleans Saints at Arizona Cardinals

Whenever you are shopping at your local Marsh, Kroger, look at the back of a milk carton. If Colston isn’t there, no one knows where he is. He’s had no game with over 5 catches or 67 yards and no touchdowns. It’s not like the Drew Brees in the Saints suddenly starting running the Maryland I. Something is off sync here, but up to now, Colston has been a huge disappointment.

Projected Stats: 4 catches for 38 yards

Honorable Mention: Matt Cassel, QB (250 yards passing, TD, 2 INT),  Beanie Wells, RB (15 carries for 54 yards), Joseph Addai, RB (12 carries for 36 yards), Braylon Edwards, WR (3 catches, 40 yards), Dez Bryant, WR (4 catches, 27 yards)

The Sleeper

Peyton Hillis, RB, Cleveland Browns versus Atlanta Falcons

Having back-to-back games of over 100 yards and a score in every game doesn’t make you a sleeper, but playing for the Cleveland Browns does. With all of Hillis’ success this season, no one is really noticing because of the team he’s on and the rarity of the success of a white running back. But jump on the bandwagon now, he’s getting all of the carries in Cleveland and has been successful so far. Just hope the bandwagon doesn’t break down before everyone else jumps on.

Projected Stats: 115 yards rushing, TD

Honorable Mention: Carson Palmer, QB (275 yards, 2 TD), Ahmad Bradshaw, RB (105 yards, 1 TDs), Jeremy Maclin, WR (6 catches, 100 yards, TD)



Sports From the Couch-Views From the Couch by jshowal2

By Jeff Showalter

It’s time to take a look back and then look ahead at what’s going on in this crazy little world of sports.

Bad news for Colts fans as Melvin Bullitt is gone for the year with a broken bone in the shoulder. I’m amazed Bullitt has lasted as long as he has considering the dude ways a buck ninety at most. I don’t care what the Colts say he ways. The Couch has stood beside Bullitt and there is no way he is over 2 bills. With Silva out, Bullitt out and Sanders out (like that was a shock), it looks like the Colts are going to be looking for a safety. You can only take “next man up” so far and Safety is too big a deal in the cover 2 defense. Tampa Bay is also looking so I would guess the Bucs list would be similar to the Colts since they play the same D.

Look Hoosier football fans, I wanted my alma mater to win as much as the rest of you but let us be honest for a minute. Bill Lynch isn’t going to win you a lot of football games with his coaching expertise. If the dude could coach, he wouldn’t be at Indiana. You can not have “co-defensive coordinators”. All that means is both guys suck and what you get is a defense that is SLOW, unprepared and incapable. Chappell threw for 480, but when you know your defense is jello, you have to have a QB that is perfect. Not many QB’s are perfect. IU does need to throw downfield more because good defensive teams are going to keep 8 back and bust the wide receivers up on these short routes.  IU has to stretch the defense. Of course after OSU hangs forty on the Cream and Crimson Saturday, it will begin to look more and more like another 4-8 season in B’Town.

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Fantasy Football has completely changed my sunday allegiances by matthudson14
September 24, 2010, 4:45 pm
Filed under: Matt Hudson, NFL | Tags:

By Matt Hudson

Last summer, when I was interning at ESPN Radio, the topic of fantasy football was broached while on the air.  I didn’t have very strong feelings about it, having never played it, and not really knowing anyone that was too serious about it.  Yet from observing from afar, it kind of felt like Guitar Hero originally felt to me – something for wannabes to do to make them feel like they were a part of something greater.  

When we talked about it on the air, one of our producers made the mistake of saying that fantasy football was for losers.  The dozens of people who called in soon thereafter could not have disagreed more.  Yet their passion for “Dungeons and Dragons for jocks” was still not enough to get me interested. 

This year, I still had reservations about it, because I wasn’t sure I would want to take any time setting up, and then following a team.  Then came the draft, complete with rookies, sleepers, and Ben Roethlisberger in the later rounds, and I actually started to care.  Now, I’m addicted.  And the strange part about it all is that it has completely altered the way I watch football on Sundays.  Normally, I watch the entire Colts game, bits and pieces of others, and highlights on NFL Network or ESPN. 

Now, every game that a player of mine is involved in, I’m watching as intently as a virgin watches his computer screen on a Saturday night.  Michael Vick may have been exciting before, but try watching him when your fantasy livelihood is on the line.  And even though fantasy football has increased my interest in NFL games I would normally be indifferent to, part of it bothers me – the part that has me rooting for players on San Diego and New England.  

I tried my best to avoid picking players on teams that I hate, but could I really pass up Ryan Mathews in the 5th round?  Looking back, I wish I had.  But in fantasy football, you have to be objective, not only picking players for teams that you like, but also teams that you despise. 

The good news is, I didn’t draft anyone on the Jets, so I can continue hating them.  It really is awkward though.  Like last weekend, I picked up New England’s defense because I figured after week one, Mark Sanchez was good for at least three interceptions.  So in a game in which I would normally be rooting for a tie, I was rooting my ass off for New England, a team that I’ve hated without reservation for a decade.  And not only did New England not win, but their defense got me one freakin’ point.  I should have known never to root for the Patriots. 

And as much as I’ve hated the Chargers, Jets, Steelers, and New England over the course of the years, I have found myself hating Jahvid Best, C.J. Spiller, and the Falcons’ medical staff more than any of those teams in the past couple weeks.

As much as it bothers me rooting for teams that I don’t like, the added advantage of fantasy football is that if your favorite football team loses that week, your fantasy team can still be your saving grace.  I couldn’t have been more pissed off about how the Colts game went in week one, yet, my fantasy team won, so my weekend wasn’t a total loss.  Is that bad? 

Is it bad that I want to see a convicted felon put up better numbers than Peyton Manning?  Is it bad that I was a little bit happy to see Hakeem Nicks score at the end of the Colts game?  Is it bad that I’d rather hang out with Matthew Berry than Halle Berry?  6 weeks ago, I would have said yes to all of those.  But now, I have a league to win. 

Maybe my observations are five years late.  Maybe everyone already knew everything I just said.  Maybe you already hate Jahvid Best as much as I do.  But ultimately, it’s just a game, and at the end of the day, we still go back to rooting for our favorite team over our fantasy team.  Right?